Dunkin’ Donuts Deploys First Vine TV Ad—and it’s Shorter than Six Seconds

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Dunkin’ Donuts made history last night during Monday Night Football’s pregame show on ESPN, running the first ever television ad made completely from Vine videos.

Four Vine videos will run during ESPN’s Monday Night Countdown throughout the 16-game season on the network’s “billboard” ad unit, a full-screen, five-second spot that airs between segments on the network. Monday’s Vine featured an animated latte that flips a coin to show the start of a football game. 

“We think a billboard using Vine is dramatically more engaging than a standard billboard with a corporate logo on it,” Scott Hudler, VP of global consumer engagement at Dunkin’ Brands, told Adweek. “Everyone is multitasking while watching TV with their phone, tablet or laptop. A lot of times, the content on their mobile device is not related to their TV shows. We want to make sure we’re supporting our TV investment with social media that’s [relevant]. It’s our job to make sure that it’s tied together to drive consumer engagement.”[more]

The second-screen effort by Dunkin’ stretches beyond the Twitter-owned video app. The brand will also tweet during each game’s final quarter with the #DunkinReplay hashtag, choosing a memorable play from the first half and virtually recreating it with Dunkin’ Donut products.


“We’ll buy Promoted Tweets on Twitter and target people who are already watching the game, so they know that this fun content is available,” said Stacey Shepatin, SVP at Hill Holliday, told Adweek. “Sports have always been one of the most social environments—especially football. So we’ll get good [intel] on whether people want to participate in this way.”

While several brands have already utilized Vine videos to advertise via social media, Nissan reportedly plans to launch a similar Vine-TV campaign, as well as Trident. Virgin Mobile recently ran ads on MTV and Comedy Central that featured a mash-up of Vine videos from a user contest


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