NESCAFÉ Opens Barista-Free DIY Coffee Taproom

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Nescafe Coffee Taproom Toronto June 2017

Toronto’s NESCAFÉ Coffee Taproom is a pop-up coffee shop for NESCAFÉ and coffee aficionados – with a twist.

Coffee can’t be purchased on-site; the idea is you make your own. The key to opening the door is a Nescafé Sweet & Creamy sachet on an iPad which divulges a secret code to enter the pop-up experience.

Toronto Nescafe Cafe pop-up

Once inside, visitors can get everything they want from a coffee shop including coffee, fast Wi-Fi, plenty of outlets and comfortable places to sit—minus the lines, complicated menu choices, pricey drinks or baristas.

This Taproom is “free of all baristas that are named Frederico and have man buns.”

Fresh cups of coffee are made on demand by NESCAFÉ consumers, using their own Sweet & Creamy sachets and the 12 hot water taps located on-site.

Toronto Nescafe Cafe pop-up

A special bonus, for those who enjoy seeing their names misspelled on a coffee cup, there are 50 different custom cups featuring misspelled versions of common names.

Toronto Coffee Taproom

The NESCAFÉ Coffee Taproom is open on Toronto’s Queen Street through June 28th.

toronto-nescafe-taproom-chair

The innovative pop-up shop is the work of creative agency WorkInProgress (WIP), which came up with the concept in response to a creative brief to create a coffee shop experience without out all the transactional business that happens in-store.

WIP created the Pizza Turnaround Campaign for Domino’s Pizza while at Crispin Porter + Bogusky, and Domino’s Cannes Lions Titanium Grand Prix-winning Emoji Ordering innovation.

Toronto Nescafe Cafe pop-up

The NESCAFÉ Coffee Taproom experience will engage Toronto-based influencers to create exclusive, original content and WIP created a Snapchat Geo-Filter accessible only on their site.

It’s already soliciting ideas on its microsite about where to open the next pop-up coffee taproom, offering a new twist on marketing and a bold experiment for a bold-tasting brand—eliminate the service element and make the consumer the barista.

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